Video Articles

Going viral against rape – Soul City Institute

Filmed in South Africa, by Soul City Institute, this film was published as an RHM Journal video submission

Using popular culture for social change: Soul City videos and a mobile clip for adolescents in South Africa

Harriet Perlman, Shereen Usdin, Jenny Button

Volume 21, Issue 41, Pages 31–34

This 45-second made-for-mobile clip was developed by Soul City Institute as part of a response to violence against women and rape in South Africa in general, but also as a focused response to a specific incident. The incident in question involved the filming on mobile phone and subsequent release on the internet of a group of teenagers raping a girl with learning disabilities. The ‘film’ went viral on social media in South Africa. Soul City Institute created “Going Viral Against Rape”, which depicts a scenario of a number of school boys watching a girl being raped on one of their mobile phones. In the end, one of the boys watching realises that the girl being raped is his sister. The mobile movie was posted on You Tube and the Soul City Institute facebook page, as well as on Praekelt Foundation’s Young Africa Live platform. This platform has approximately 1. 3 million dedicated users. Within three weeks the mobile clip had received at least 5,000 primary views. Soul City Institute received comments from a range of stakeholders and also unsolicited feedback from individuals in civil society supporting the messaging.

 

 

Date

30th April 2015

Author

RHM Journal

Share this video

Voces de Cuenca

Filmed in Cuenca, Ecuador, this film was published as an RHM Journal video submission
When target groups talk back: at the intersection of visual ethnography and adolescent sexual health
Erica Nelson, Dylan Howitt
Reproductive Health Matters, Vol. 21, Issue 41, p45–48

Voces de Cuenca, was created with the aim of giving young people the chance to speak directly to those responsible for designing adolescent sexual and reproductive health (SRH) intervention strategies in Cuenca, Ecuador (e.g. my colleagues on Project CERCA, a European Union FP7-funded research intervention), in addition to NGOS, municipal and regional representatives of education and health departments. The voices we hear include adolescents from a participatory-ethnographic research workshop that I conducted, young adults who had received training in adolescent SRH outreach from a previous IPPF-funded project in Cuenca, English language students we met on the street who exchanged speaking on camera for an interview with us, and the brother of an acquaintance.
More information about the making of this film is in the RHM Journal paper by Erica Nelson

See Erica Nelson’s further writing about this project:

The unintended consequences of sex education: an ethnography of a development intervention in Latin America

Date

30th May 2013

Author

xanda

Share this video

Tres Generaciones

Filmed in Chinquintad, Ecuador in 2012 Tres Generaciones was published as an RHM Journal video submission
When target groups talk back: at the intersection of visual ethnography and adolescent sexual health
Erica Nelson, Dylan Howitt
Reproductive Health Matters, Vol. 21, Issue 41, p45–48

Tres Generaciones, formed part of the in-depth ethnographic research …carried out over five months in 2012 in the semi-rural parish of Chiquintad (Ecuador). This…documentary was created as a jumping-off point for discussions on cultural and generational taboos surrounding talk and advice-giving on sex and sexuality within families…
The three individuals in the video (grandmother, mother, daughter) are not meant to be representative “types”, but their stories give some insight into the radical transformation of sexual and reproductive health attitudes and knowledge over a 40-year period….
The idea was to provide historical and cultural context to a public health project aimed at transforming the way that families talk about issues related to adolescent sexual and reproductive health. The film reflects (the view) that to begin to change these day-to-day conversations about acceptable and expected behaviour of young people, as they enter a period of sexual exploration that may lead to a potential hardening of gender norms, it is important for them to know more about what previous generations have lived and experienced themselves.

More information about the making of this film is in the RHM Journal paper by Erica Nelson 

See Erica Nelson’s further writing about this project:

The unintended consequences of sex education: an ethnography of a development intervention in Latin America

Date

30th May 2013

Author

RHM Journal

Share this video